Villa Style

As I had mentioned in my previous post, our client wanted to know what an elaborate wrought iron stair would cost, based on these to stairs as conceptual starting points.

 

Using as many standard components as possible, we created a design that looked like this.

 

Our client was not happy with the look, so I sketched up another option which she found to be acceptable.

Working with King and Company, the stair fabricator, we priced the stair several different ways, all of which required drawings… (I now call Bob King The Stair Meister! The man id GOOD!) The above the stair priced out at about 3.5 times the originally proposed and budgeted wood stair, which used standard wood balusters from a company such as L. J. Smith, custom hand rail and exposed treads.

We then looked at what a stair would cost using simple individual wrought iron balusters, a custom hand rail and exposed treads. That was about 1.3 – 1.5 times the original budgeted stair. The price was right, but we could not find any balusters that were acceptable.

Our last option was a fully custom wood stair with a curb. This priced out at about 1.3 times the original budget. King and Company turned the custom baluster we used is on the left.

 

Every step of the way, Bob King showed us what the stair would look like. The final curb design looked like this.

 

Over, the effect looked like this.

 

King and Company turned 6 different baluster heights due to the compound curve of the defending stair!

 

Fast forward to the last month or so…

The walnut stain was selected for the floors and stair treads.

 

Fabrication was well under way in Bob King’s shop…

 

And then today’s installation!

 

With the stair in place, the arched opening under the stair leading to the living room can be completed. YES!!!

Tomorrow, the custom back stairs will be installed. Finally feels like things are coming together!

Note: We have some concerns about the paint color on the balusters and will probably be tweaking them a little, possibly “graying them out” somewhat.

Cheers,

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As I began to map out the post it became clear that in order to tell the story properly, it needed to be broken down into parts. It has been a long, interesting, educational and at times painful journey. Having said that – all ended well, but not at all where we started… Today, I am sticking just to the pretty pictures and sources of inspiration, to give you an idea of where we started.

The floor plan below shows locates the stair in the context of

the floor tile layout and several adjoining rooms off the foyer. It is a two story space with the second floor stair landing/hall running from right to left above the family room and kitchen.

In reality the stair and tile layout were conceived simultaneously. The following images are examples of stairs and tile layouts we drew inspiration and ideas from.

Our client loved the tile pattern/border in Brooke Astor’s Holly Hill House. We also drew inspiration from how the stair lands and flairs, which will be more evident in my next post.

SERGE J.F. LEVY/AP Photographer

 

The sweep of the hand rail form the Nathaniel Russell House… Look closely, the hand rail is composed of many individually carved curved segments.

Sje fell in love with this older wrought iron stair balustrade.

And this more modern spin on a similar motif.

 

Sally and I had budgetary concerns and in fact much preferred the character of stairs with simpler wrought iron balusters, as in these examples.

 

Before our client was willing to consider a simple baluster, we had to go thru the “exercise” of what would the more complex balustrade cost.

And so the adventure began…

Stay tuned…

Cheers,

To visit our website, click here.

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If you would like our assistance on your design project, contact us here.

 

 

 

 

I thought I’d begin my reports on the progress of our French Villa Style home by starting with the exterior of the house. Typically, we do not get involved with the selection of exterior finishes, materials, doors, lighting, etc., but in this case we were asked to comment and it evolved into full participation – helping select the color of the tile roof, stucco, limestone and window trim. We began the process by looking at pictures of similar homes and their color schemed with our client and their contractor for ideas and inspiration.

Pretty front doors…

 

This home has a brick facade (Don’t you LOVE it?), but it’s good for looking at tonality of color and hue.

 

This one pushed it with the purple shutters and trim.

 

Earthy and serene.

 

This is close to the color scheme we selected.

 

Then it was on to the front doors, which are not yet finalized, but we’re close… Again, we looked at what seemed like thousands of pictures. I researched Louis XVI style and architecture. It seemed never ending. Yet, this is sooooo important. A front door is like a greeting card. It makes that all important first impression. Here are several examples.

 

We then looked at how various door styles might look from the street and as you approached the house.

 

 

We’ve ended up with a design that is similar to these doors.

 

Next, a tour of the preliminary foyer design.

Have a wonderful Holiday!

To visit our website, click here.

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If you would like our assistance on your design project, contact us here.