Villa Style

With over 3,500 images to sort thru this turned out to be a much more difficult task than I had originally imagined. There are well over 300 “favorite ” images including building exteriors, landscapes, stairs, lighting, paneling, floors, etc. (And this doesn’t include the food/restaurant pics…) Some of these images serve a practical purpose as I see a detail I feel I can learn something from. Others record a “Holy Cow! that is incredible!!!” moment.

I’ll start with this one – a happy accident. Taken in the Louvre, I took a picture of the crown molding detail of a museum display case. It wasn’t until later, going thru the images when Sally and I returned to Salem that I saw what was in the background. I guess I was hyper focused… (We designers can be like that…)

From the Louvre as well. Note – the marble on left is faux. Sally and I saw this frequently and were in awe of it’s beauty.

 

I’m quite sure I took this at Versailles. Several important things here. The use of crystal to reflect and reflect light, increasing/enhancing the candle light from the chandelier. How the adjacent room is connected visually thru the use of light. And as I as to began to see and understand as our visit went on, as ornate as the crown and wall/panel trim were, they were based on the same classical orders and forms as later less orange periods/styles. There was great continuity as one style evolved and morphed into the next over several centuries.

And this was simply overwhelming… The lantern in foyers and foyer-like spaces was an element we saw repeatedly.

 

Fontainebleau yielded a few gems. The scale of this chandelier was massive!

It was interesting to see how Napoleon adapted rooms to his taste and style. This is the ceiling in his bedchamber, formerly the king’s reception chamber.

Vaux Le Vicomte was my favorite chateau and the predecessor to Louis XIV‘s Versailles.  Let’s start with a ceiling detail in the foyer. Spectacularly classical and ahead of it’s time.

These next two images display unbelievable faux painting/finish work. The sheer number of talented artisans employed to complete/finish buildings such as this boggles my imagination.

When Louis XIV had his finance minister, Nicholas Fouquet arrested, he stripped Vaux Le Vicomte of many of it’s valuable features, including tapestries. I believe the fabric panels and frieze indicate where tapestries originally hung. Note again, the extent of faux painting.

A ceiling detail of Fouquet’s bed chamber.  The image speaks for itself…

The bed chamber… No wonder a young Louis XIV was jealous, had him arrested and put in prison for life!

 

And I conclude with an image from the Carnavalet Museum, whose purpose is to preserve the history of the city of Paris. While the museum was described to us as a collection of historical artifacts, it was so very much more – especially the rooms that they have salvaged and preserved as the grand “Hotels” of Paris were demolished years ago.

And an image I need to figure out where it was taken… My guess is Versailles or the Louvre.

 

Hope you’ve had a mini-vacation as we slide into the month of December and the Holiday Season.

Cheers,

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Ironically, I am going to start the series with our last 48 hours in Belgium and France. Sally and I awaken in Bruges in our lovely room in our guest house, Bonifacius.

 

We enjoy a lovely breakfast in the bay window overlooking the canal.

 

On the train ride to Charles De Gaulle airport, as the gorgeous countryside slips quickly by…

 

…I remember and replay in my mind the places I have seen and visited, the experiences Sally and I have had.

The canal boat ride in Bruges. I always see things differently from the water.

 

Lounging in the Luxembourg Gardens, trying to decide which bistro to go to for drinks before dinner with Sally.

 

Or a relaxing lunch at Les Deux Magots where we visited with the the lovely couple next to us. They had just arrived from Cannes. He to hunt for a week. Their irish setter sat quietly by their table the entire meal! She to visit family and friends.

But I digress.

We board the plane and settle in for the long flight home and then… An announcement is made, the plane has been damaged by a baggage truck and is unsuitable to fly, please deplane while arrangements are made for a new plane.

 

We are told a new plane will be available in about an hour’s time. I amuse myself by taking pictures of the airport sky.

 

Long story short, at 8:30 that evening the flight is officially canceled and we are all told arrangements have been made to put us up in a nearby hotel for the night. Our new flight is scheduled to depart the following day at 1 PM. We get our voucher at about 9:30 and are told the shuttle bus is at Terminal 2 Level 1 or something to that effect, see you in the morning. it is then everyone on the plane learns exactly how big Charles de Gaulle airport really is. Arrival at the hotel is somewhat chaotic with checking in and racing to dinner because the dining room closes at 10:30. The accommodations were in “sharp contrast” to the room we woke up in Bruges.

The dining room.

 

Classy plastic wine bucket…

Elevator lobby.

Nice hall decor…

 

Morning came and we arose full of hope! Our flight was scheduled to depart at 1 PM. (We were hoping our luggage was going to make it on the correct flight as we had not seen it since we checked in to our canceled flight the day before.) 1 PM, no plane at the gate. 1:30, no plane at the gate. 2 PM it announced we are to be bussed to the plane at the other end of the airport! 350+ people – 2 busses. Eventually the plane is loaded and we take off! (Air France, you had us all wondering…)

The flight was uneventful. Arriving in Boston and the cab ride home felt almost anti-climactic. We lost our day of rest due to the flight cancelation and Thursday was full of meetings. Re-entry was rather abrupt… On the other hand, now that we’re back, going thru the 3,500 plus pictures we took has turned into a virtual vacation.

(LOVE the pan function on my phone!)

Speaking of virtual vacations, our very talented design assistant Kathryn immediately borrowed our trip picture files and has given herself her own virtual vacation, which she will be doing several guest blog posts about – what images spoke/resonated with her and why.

 

Cheers,

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Following up on my previous post, the walk in pantry has come a long way from where it began…

 

Previously the space was one of several back doors/vestibules to the house and had accumulated a certain amount of “dead” storage… By converting the area to a pantry, we were able to consolidate kitchen and dining related items that had been sprinkled about the house and basement. We replaced the back door with a window for ambient daylight and three Murano glass pendants will hang from the ceiling, centered on the cabinet door openings  on the left. The backsplash will be granite to match the counter top. All switching and electrical outlets will be upgraded to Legrand Adorne product.

 

As I write this post, the oak floors are being bleached and very, very, very lightly stained in preparation for the arrival of our decorative painters.

Next, the mud room and home office.

 

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