Traditional Style

This Saturday, Sally and I were delighted to learn Ocean Home magazine had named Wilson Kelsey Design as one of it’s 2016 Top 50 Interior Designers. “The Ocean Home 50 includes high-profile designers – including Bunny Williams, Martyn Lawrence Bullard and Vicente Wolf – but also an array of lesser-known yet equally masterful interior designers creating exceptional designs for coastal homes from Laguna Beach to The Hamptons,” comments Andrew Conway, Ocean Home’s editor.

 

Ocean Homes magazine 2016 Top 50 Interior Designers

It means a great deal to us that Ocean Homes would put their name behind ours.

Oceanview Sun Room; Wilson Kelsey Design; photographer Rick Mandelkorn

There are many others who deserve credit and our thanks for their commitment to excellence, quality and great design! Our clients, the architects and engineers we work with, the contractors and their subs who actually make it all happen, drapery work rooms, artists and art galleries, decorative painters, antique dealers, custom cabinetry shops. etc. We’d be just another name and face in the crowd with out you. Well done!

Cheers,

John Kelsey, Wilson Kelsey Design

If you would like our assistance in creating your Coastal Home, contact us here.

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Toady was a day I’d been looking forward to for some time, and I admit, with a mix of anxiety, anticipation and excitement. Back in September, a client asked if WKD could design a hidden door for them. (You can see the preliminary design proposals in a previous blog post here.) I knew I had assembled a great team to fabricate, finish and install the door, but I didn’t know how good until today. Let me introduce my guys. Rich Laperchia of Alpine Woodworks who prepared a fabulous set of shop drawings and helped me work thru a number of little niggly detail questions, Dave Taubenack of Fantastic Finishes, whose eye for color/tint/hue is beyond belief and can match any sample you give him and David West of Meadowview Construction and his team of  “the best behaved boys in construction”. Cutting to the chase, I can design something fabulous, do a terrific set of drawings and specifications to communicate my design intent. But it’s the guys who know and understand the means and methods of construction that I depend on. They’re the guys who actually make the vision real. It’s their commitment, pride of craft and attention to detail that actually creates something beautiful. These guys nailed it!

So here we are – the before.

concealed door, before; Wilson Kelsey Design

The after… See why I’m so excited???

concealed door, after; Wilson Kelsey Design

Wine cellar on the left. Bar on the right. I borrowed details from the bar and used them as the basic design vocabulary in the door.

concealed door, after; Wilson Kelsey Design

In the finish shop just after the door had come out of the spray booth – antique glaze yet to be applied.

concealed door detail; Wilson Kelsey Design

Dave and Dan fussing over all the little things.

Dave tending to details; Wilson Kelsey Design

Dan tending to details; Wilson Kelsey Design

Bookshelves.

concealed door detail; Wilson Kelsey Design

concealed door detail; Wilson Kelsey Design

I would be remise if I didn’t include Ladd Cook, the local rep for The Original Book Works, Ltd., who so patiently answered all  my questions about faux books and shepherded the book order thru production in England. The books are truly the icing on the cake and make the door.

Cheers,

John

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If you would like our assistance on your design project, contact us here.

The Lure of the Louvre

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If Sally and I had tickets to fly to Paris for the Holidays this year, we would go in a minute. Sadly we do not… If we were, we would plan another visit to the Louvre. It’s collections are so vast, it is impossible to see them all in a day. My guess it would take a week. During our stay, Sally and I mapped out a day, planning to spend the  bulk of our time in the Richelieu wing taking in it’s architecture and details. As I have mentioned in previous posts, my feeling is that French architecture and details of the 17th and 18th century are very different from our English Heritage.

This room pretty much sums it up visually.

Louvre room pan; photographer John Kelsey

louvre rm 4; photographer John Kelsey

 I’ll focus on the paneled walls in this post. There are three different trim profiles! On the left, trim #1 below wainscot and above wainscot. Smaller, more delicate, it is used to frame the larger decorative wall panels.

Louvre detail 6; photographer John Kelsey

Close up of trim # 1. Notice how paint is used to help define/reinforce the inner raised panel.

Louvre trim 1, photographer John Kelsey

Trim #2, below wainscot and decorative wall panel. Visually, it felt like a picture frame floating within another piece of trim.

Louvre trim 1 at base; photographer John Kelsey

Louvre below wainscot; photographer John Kelsey

And the third decorative panel trim above the chair rail.

Louvre panel trim; photographer John Kelsey

The simple chair rail.

Louvre room chair rail; photographer John Kelsey

And amazingly sensuous door jamb.

Louvre door jamb; photographer john Kelsey

Have you noticed how few, if any, true radius curves are used?

Sally and I found these shaped repeated in many variations and forms. Their expression and use was consistent, even though each room was decorated differently, including rooms from different periods.

Let’s take a look, shall we?

Louvre, Sally peaking; photographer John Kelsey

louvre rm 3; photographer John Kelsey

Wainscot detail… Panel trim similar to trim #1 above. Much simpler door jamb. but it retains a sexy curve.

Louvre wainscot detail; photographer John Kelsey

Trim similar to #3 above.

Louvre wainscot detail; photographer John Kelsey

While highly ornamental, the trim hierarchy remains the same.

Louvre wainscot detail; photographer John Kelsey

Shall we take break and grab a snack?

Louvre lunchtime view, photographer John Kelsey

Angelina's at the Louvre; phtographer John Kelsey

Refreshed? Let’s conclude with a few artsy shots that capture the mood.

In no particular order. Winged Victory.

winged victory, photographer John Kelsey

I found myself looking upwards frequently.

molding detail, photographer John Kelsey

Interior courtyard.

Louvre exterior detail; photographer john Kelsey

Crystal chandelier.

Louvre chandelier; Photographer, John Kelsey

Interior courtyard.

Louvre interior courtyard; Photographer John Kelsey

French style eye candy.

French Style eye candy; photographer John Kelsey

Hope you enjoyed and have been inspired by the tour… Next stop Versailles.

Cheers,

John

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If you would like our assistance on your design project, contact us here.