Federal Style

This Saturday, Sally and I were delighted to learn Ocean Home magazine had named Wilson Kelsey Design as one of it’s 2016 Top 50 Interior Designers. “The Ocean Home 50 includes high-profile designers – including Bunny Williams, Martyn Lawrence Bullard and Vicente Wolf – but also an array of lesser-known yet equally masterful interior designers creating exceptional designs for coastal homes from Laguna Beach to The Hamptons,” comments Andrew Conway, Ocean Home’s editor.

 

Ocean Homes magazine 2016 Top 50 Interior Designers

It means a great deal to us that Ocean Homes would put their name behind ours.

Oceanview Sun Room; Wilson Kelsey Design; photographer Rick Mandelkorn

There are many others who deserve credit and our thanks for their commitment to excellence, quality and great design! Our clients, the architects and engineers we work with, the contractors and their subs who actually make it all happen, drapery work rooms, artists and art galleries, decorative painters, antique dealers, custom cabinetry shops. etc. We’d be just another name and face in the crowd with out you. Well done!

Cheers,

John Kelsey, Wilson Kelsey Design

If you would like our assistance in creating your Coastal Home, contact us here.

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Last spring, Sally and I prepared and video taped a 90 minute presentation about French Style based on our trips to Paris that we presented as part of Boston Design Week. The premise was to share our knowledge and what we have learned about how to create French Style in Your Home. The presentation was broken down into 4 parts.

1. Differentiating French from English Influence

2. Architectural Elements of French Style.

3. Decorative French Style: Room by Room

4. Modern Examples of French Style

In Differentiating French from English Influence, Sally and I illustrate how different stylistically the United States was from the French during the late 18th/early 19th centuries due to our English influence and heritage.

First, the French are sexy.

Sexy French Style

While we’re reserved, stoic. (Especially we New Englanders.)

English stoic

French food has been turned into a high art form.

French food

While our Colonial/Puritan heritage tells us food is fuel.

Colonial food

French interiors are dramatic.

french interior; photo by Wilson Kelsey Design

Compared to our Colonial Period interiors.

colonial interior

Clearly, our English heritage sent us down a different fork in the road. This will become more evident in this video and those that follow.

Who knows what would have happened if the outcome of the French and Indian War had been different? We might be speaking French!

Enjoy…

 

 Part 2 explores the architectural building blocks of creating French Style in your home.

Cheers,

John Kelsey, Wilson Kelsey Design

If you would like our assistance in creating your French Style Home, contact us here.

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After all the rain we’ve this past week, Sally and I needed to get out and stretch our legs. Recently, I attended Northshore Magazine’s launch party for their new publication, Northshore Home, at Willowdale, located in Bradley Palmer State Park, which reminded me that next door was the Mass Audubon Society’s Ipswich River Wildlife Sanctuary. (A kitchen we designed for an Ipswich client was included in the inaugural issue.) So, on Sunday afternoon we took the opportunity to visit to the Sanctuary. Knowing that the Topsfield Fair was in full swing, we took to the back roads to get there.

The Sanctuary visitor center is located in the Samuel Bradford House, built in 1763. Georgian/Federal influence is clearly evident in it’s exterior details. We were both impressed by the size of the central chimney. Our guess is there are a minimum of 6, possibly 8 fireplaces in the house.

Samuel Bradford House, Ipswich Wildlife Sanctuary; photographer, John Kelsey

It’s lovely front portico. I was interested in seeing how the window casing around the upper windows was integrated into the decorative trim under the eves, as I had been asked to help solve this very problem about two months ago. Based on what I saw here, I got it right! Whew!!!

Samuel Bradford House, Ipswich Wildlife Sanctuary; photographer, John Kelsey

A first – a the bullnose window sill. File this away under Federal Window Details. You never know… Love the simple watertable detail and locally quarried rubble foundation below the window.

Samuel Bradford House, Ipswich Wildlife Sanctuary; photographer, John Kelsey

The real purpose of our visit wasn’t the architecture, but to inhale the fresh fall air and savor the fall foliage and changing of the seasons. The vista from the front of the house did not disappoint, with an added bonus of about 50 bluebirds flitting about the field.

Ipswich Wildlife Sanctuary; photographer, John Kelsey

Sally played peek-a-boo with me the entire afternoon…

Organic tree forms abounded.

Ipswich Wildlife Sanctuary; photographer, John Kelsey

The Rockery delighted.

Ipswich Wildlife Sanctuary; photographer, John Kelsey

The Sycamore impressed.

Ipswich Wildlife Sanctuary; photographer, John Kelsey

The view of Rockery Pond reminded us of the Monet Water Lilies show we saw in the d’Orsay Museum in Paris last fall.

Ipswich Wildlife Sanctuary; photographer, John Kelsey

monets-water-lilies

As did the stone bridge of our visit to Vaux le Vicomte.

Ipswich Wildlife Sanctuary; photographer, John Kelsey

vaux le vicomte; photographer,  John Kelsey

These views trigger memories and we make connections to ideas, colors, patterns, textures and forms we were unaware of before.

As do the little things at our feet.

Ipswich Wildlife Sanctuary; photographer, John Kelsey

Ipswich Wildlife Sanctuary; photographer, John Kelsey

Ipswich Wildlife Sanctuary; photographer, John Kelsey

 Tigger’s favorite food, Haycorns…

Ipswich Wildlife Sanctuary; photographer, John Kelsey

The contrast between vista and up close and personal was constant, reminding us of how much our spirit and soul need both to be complete.

Ipswich River Wildlife Sanctuary; photographer, John Kelsey

As we returned to our car, the path took us between two old overgrown stone walls. Mother Nature is slowly reclaiming her land… I find this reminder of her constancy comforting.

Ipswich River Wildlife Sanctuary; photographer, John Kelsey

Thanks for joining Sally and me on our walk. Until next Sunday…

Cheers,

John

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If you would like our assistance on your design project, contact us here.