Design Ideas

Several months ago Sally was contacted by a past client with a request to help her design a family room in her walk out basement overlooking the links at Ipswich Country Club. She wanted it to be stylish, masculine and done with flair. Here are two of Sally’s proposals for the large blank wall immediately to the right of the bar. Both were to done by decorative artists. One was rather formal – tromp l’oeil wainscot, columns, crown molding, etc. There was a lengthy discussion as to whether the dogs would be statues or part to the painting.

The second was much more stylish and whimsical. Again, tromp l’oeil, with drapery hung in front of the “open door”. What fun! Sadly, neither of these happened. Instead we’re considering a custom wallpaper.

She’s an interesting client, who likes to take on certain aspects of the project herself, meaning that aspects of Sally’s work is conceptual. It makes for an interesting collaborative process. The project is about 75% complete and yesterday Sally got a call asking for help resolving the profile of the countertop at the bar. So, armed with measuring tape, pencils and erasers, we headed to the job site today to see what could be done. I actually enjoy these little problems. You have to think on your feet and be decisive. Otherwise, the job slows down – or on occasion grind to a halt… Fortunately, this one was easy. In about 15 minutes a solution was sketched out on a piece of plywood set on top of the bar. This was one of several modifications we made.

 

While we were there, I took several detail snapshots of the job site. First the overview of the bar area, where most of the action is occurring at the moment.

Peaking out from under the floor protection you can see the  handiwork of our talented decorative painters, Zoe Design. (Note the books in the cabinet Sally was testing for appropriateness.)

 

A detail shot of the floor and the sink.

 

The Porcelanosa tile back bar backsplash and custom wall paper designed and produced by Zoe Design.

Yes, those are guinea fowl feathers… Incredible texture, yes?

I’ll save the powder room until another day. We all know what spackle looks like…

 

Cheers,

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I wanted to follow up on our previous post about being published in the Summer issue of Boston Common magazine. Due to editorial limitations, our comments on another house were not used on the story. Sally and I felt they were worthwhile sharing, as they illustrate how we can help a real estate broker better represent a home’s potential, or if we’re working with a client, how we can help them better visualize a room.

We commented on two rooms in the house – a large living room and the kitchen. In this post, I will focus on the living room, which you see below.

In it’s current state, the room struggles with it’s identity. The architecture reminds me of Arts and Crafts detailing. The furniture – I not quit sure what’s going on… The wood trim is too dark while the mantel, which should be the focal point and anchor of the room is too weak. The chandeliers and sconces need help.

We proposed lightening the trim color and reworking the mantel/hearth area creating a cozy inviting place where you would want to settle in a linger – have a good conversation with  friends or become absorbed in a good book and add a friendlier chandelier. We proposed adding boxed beams, making the room feel smaller and intimate.

After preparing the sketch, I felt the mantel was too heavy – needing to be softened and lightened in scale and feel. The elevation sketch below is much more to my liking.

Pulling this together was intense and a just little crazy. On the other hand, (occasionally) it’s fun to test yourself and find out what you can create in a limited amount of time.

Cheers,

To visit our website, click here.

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If you would like our assistance on your design project, contact us here.

 

 

Good Morning All!

Sally and I are delighted to be featured in the Summer Issue of Boston Common magazine. (Find us on page 103.) We were asked by it’s editor to review and comment on  a property that is currently for sale at One Charles Street South, in the Back Bay of Boston. They are the only two side by side penthouse units on the market in Boston today. Of course they offer spectacular views of the city, particularly from their private decks and patios.

Sally and I explored the notion of combining the units. Our design concept was to create a grand centrally located foyer/gallery with private family spaces to it’s left and public/gathering/entertainment spaces to it’s right. Each would have it’s own terrace/patio space.

Included in the story was a sketch I did, showing a fanciful notion of how the public space might appear – that being quite modern and open, with one space flowing into the next, with areas defined by ceiling treatments and light fixtures.

We imagined the foyer, the entire penthouse for that matter, in two very distinctly different styles. The first being quote modern, in the manner of Richard Hallberg.

 

The other, quite surprisingly, more traditional with today’s flair, as in the work of John Saladino.

In either case, the overall space lends itself to a series to wonderfully created enfilades, as in the old classic French style.

The listing is being handled by William Montero, of Warren Residential Group, 617, 312-7232.

Have a wonderful day!

 

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