Classical Architecture

Following up on my previous post, the walk in pantry has come a long way from where it began…

 

Previously the space was one of several back doors/vestibules to the house and had accumulated a certain amount of “dead” storage… By converting the area to a pantry, we were able to consolidate kitchen and dining related items that had been sprinkled about the house and basement. We replaced the back door with a window for ambient daylight and three Murano glass pendants will hang from the ceiling, centered on the cabinet door openings  on the left. The backsplash will be granite to match the counter top. All switching and electrical outlets will be upgraded to Legrand Adorne product.

 

As I write this post, the oak floors are being bleached and very, very, very lightly stained in preparation for the arrival of our decorative painters.

Next, the mud room and home office.

 

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Two years ago, we were retained to decorate a Back Bay condo on the first block of Marlborough Street. At the time, we were not allowed to professionally photograph the finished project nor use it in any of our publicity. Recently, it came to our attention that the property was on the market showing photographs of the finished interior and we felt free to at least talk about the project here on our blog. As you will see, the existing architecture was gorgeous, thus our scope of work was furniture, fabrics, and selective decorative lighting, artwork and accessories.

Programmatically, our charge was to design/create stylish, easy, comfortable living areas in a traditional setting. Design the first level for entertaining large groups of people. The second level was intended for personal family living/relaxing and bedrooms. (Sally had a ball!!!)

Dining area.

LivingRoom/Parlor with it’s original chandelier for the mid 1860′s. Can’t you imagine a hosting party here, with a small quartet playing the background?

 

A few vignette snapshots taken during installation.

 

Kitchen.

Note the corner of the custom sectional sofa Sally designed for the space. A true kitchen lounge!

Library on Second Level with it’s original restored paneling. The perfect place to wind down at the end of the day!

My biggest regret is that I never saw nor do we have a photo of the lovely custom console with a built in TV lift I designed that was placed in the living  room, so beautifully fabricated by Hawkes and Huberdeau.

This piece deserves a separate post on it’s development.

(If I can corner Sally for a moment, I’ll come back and add info on furniture manufacturers, etc.)

 

Cheers,

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As I had mentioned in my previous post, our client wanted to know what an elaborate wrought iron stair would cost, based on these to stairs as conceptual starting points.

 

Using as many standard components as possible, we created a design that looked like this.

 

Our client was not happy with the look, so I sketched up another option which she found to be acceptable.

Working with King and Company, the stair fabricator, we priced the stair several different ways, all of which required drawings… (I now call Bob King The Stair Meister! The man id GOOD!) The above the stair priced out at about 3.5 times the originally proposed and budgeted wood stair, which used standard wood balusters from a company such as L. J. Smith, custom hand rail and exposed treads.

We then looked at what a stair would cost using simple individual wrought iron balusters, a custom hand rail and exposed treads. That was about 1.3 – 1.5 times the original budgeted stair. The price was right, but we could not find any balusters that were acceptable.

Our last option was a fully custom wood stair with a curb. This priced out at about 1.3 times the original budget. King and Company turned the custom baluster we used is on the left.

 

Every step of the way, Bob King showed us what the stair would look like. The final curb design looked like this.

 

Over, the effect looked like this.

 

King and Company turned 6 different baluster heights due to the compound curve of the defending stair!

 

Fast forward to the last month or so…

The walnut stain was selected for the floors and stair treads.

 

Fabrication was well under way in Bob King’s shop…

 

And then today’s installation!

 

With the stair in place, the arched opening under the stair leading to the living room can be completed. YES!!!

Tomorrow, the custom back stairs will be installed. Finally feels like things are coming together!

Note: We have some concerns about the paint color on the balusters and will probably be tweaking them a little, possibly “graying them out” somewhat.

Cheers,

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If you would like our assistance on your design project, contact us here.