Belgian Style

As I had mentioned in my previous post, our client wanted to know what an elaborate wrought iron stair would cost, based on these to stairs as conceptual starting points.

 

Using as many standard components as possible, we created a design that looked like this.

 

Our client was not happy with the look, so I sketched up another option which she found to be acceptable.

Working with King and Company, the stair fabricator, we priced the stair several different ways, all of which required drawings… (I now call Bob King The Stair Meister! The man id GOOD!) The above the stair priced out at about 3.5 times the originally proposed and budgeted wood stair, which used standard wood balusters from a company such as L. J. Smith, custom hand rail and exposed treads.

We then looked at what a stair would cost using simple individual wrought iron balusters, a custom hand rail and exposed treads. That was about 1.3 – 1.5 times the original budgeted stair. The price was right, but we could not find any balusters that were acceptable.

Our last option was a fully custom wood stair with a curb. This priced out at about 1.3 times the original budget. King and Company turned the custom baluster we used is on the left.

 

Every step of the way, Bob King showed us what the stair would look like. The final curb design looked like this.

 

Over, the effect looked like this.

 

King and Company turned 6 different baluster heights due to the compound curve of the defending stair!

 

Fast forward to the last month or so…

The walnut stain was selected for the floors and stair treads.

 

Fabrication was well under way in Bob King’s shop…

 

And then today’s installation!

 

With the stair in place, the arched opening under the stair leading to the living room can be completed. YES!!!

Tomorrow, the custom back stairs will be installed. Finally feels like things are coming together!

Note: We have some concerns about the paint color on the balusters and will probably be tweaking them a little, possibly “graying them out” somewhat.

Cheers,

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Great progress is being made on our French Neoclassical Style project. The roof and windows are in, stucco is complete.  The custom front and side doors are on site waiting for the door hardware to arrive. Life is good. If you follow us on Facebook, you will be familiar with a few of these images.

Merrimack Design Associates did a wonderful job designing the exterior of the house! Trim, copper, portico, still to be done…

Inside, blueboard and plaster are going up. Views of the living room and adjoining dining room. It’s always at this stage, when I see a really good plaster job, I find myself wondering,”Why bother painting?” And “Who needs crown molding, trim, etc. when a room’s proportion are right?”

 

View from the family room toward the mud room with blueboard waiting to be hung. The arched openings are a reoccurring theme throughout the first floor.

 

Off site, the custom stair for the foyer is well under way at King and Company’s shop. Bob King is the Stairmeister!

We finalized the floor and stair tread/hand rail stain today. Love it when a plan comes together! A full stair post will be for another day…

 

Cheers,

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If you would like our assistance on your design project, contact us here.

 

 

 

 

 

Updating a Kitchen

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In the midst of getting ready for a major presentation to client tomorrow, I wanted to squeeze in the follow up to my previous post. This is the kitchen that did not make it in to the Boston Common story.

In spite of all the lighting, the dark trim and black countertops make the room feel very dark. I would rework the lighting layout, bringing more light the bear on the work surfaces and counter tops. Personally, I’ve never liked exhaust hoods over the kitchen island. They’re obtrusive and generally pretty ugly. Having said that, if you have to have one, make it a piece of sculpture. Use it to enhance your kitchen experience.

 

Taking my own advice, I designed a sculptural exhaust hood, which incorporates it’s own task lighting. The trim has been lightened and a light granite or marble back splash and counter top helps brighten the space. (I might do the entire kitchen in a light or fumed French oak.) The floor has been replaced with a more durable and lighter colored staggered stone pattern. To give the cabinets and island a furniture-like appearance, I eliminated the toe kick space, except where the fridge and micro wave are located. You can see the hutch leg peaking out from behind the island… By adding panels to the fridge doors and putting the micro wave behind a set of doors, I have been able to design a built in that has the appearance of a tall hutch. I do like the notion of the open shelves above the sinks, but they need to be framed better, so I added closed cabinets at each end. The glass doors have been redone to make them feel more window-like.

Viola!!!

Now it’s back to meeting preparations!

Have a wonderful weekend!

Cheers,

To visit our website, click here.

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If you would like our assistance on your design project, contact us here.