Custom Furniture/Cabinetry

Looking for kitchen design inspiration today, I came across a photo of a glorious kitchen – my guess is Paris or similar environ. While not right for what I am currently working on, it was instant kitchen love. I normally don’t like Ghost Chairs. But here, my first thought was Perfect!!! Cabinets become modern sculpture in the space, acting as a foil for the exuberance of the crown molding. Most of the time blue walls leave me cold. If this room gets evening light, I’ll bet the paint absolutely glows and changes color, mimicking the changing evening/night sky. Spot on!!!

Beautiful European Kitchen, Source Unknown

 My regret is I was moving so fast I failed to note the image source or if there was a designer credit.

So if you see this and can help me credit the designer, let me know who it is.

Cheers,

John

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After a wonderful client meeting in Milton this past Friday morning, Sally and I gave ourselves permission to taken part of the afternoon off. It was lunchtime and while the air was humid, the temps were comfortable and the sky hinted of a Dutch Master’s hand.

Farnham's saltmarsh view; Wilson Kelsey Design

We drove straight to Farnham’s in Ipswich for fried clams and a lobster roll. While other’s may say Woodman’s or the Clam Shack up the street have the best fried clams, Sally and I have always loved the lightly breaded style of Farnham’s. And the view of the Essex Salt Marsh is beyond compare.

Farnham's, Ipswich, MA

Farnham's fried calms

Farnham's lobster roll

Our appetites satisfied, we hopped in the car and drove a very short distance north on Rt. 133 for a walk on the Allyn Cox Reservation, headquarters of the Greenbelt, Essex County’s Land Trust. The reservation consists of 26 acres of land, salt marsh and river frontage on the Essex River.

Greenbelt, Allyn Cox Reservation

We took the short walk to the Essex River, where we could see Choate Island and the back of Crane Beach and the Crane Estate, a Trustees of Reservations property.

Choate Island

Crane Beach, Essex River front from Allyn Cox Reservation

We reminded ourselves to take the Essex River cruise next time…

Essex River Cruise

Back at the car, we decided to drop in on one of favorite North Shore antique shops, Andrew Spindler Antiques.  Allen has an eye for  the very special and unique, regardless of period or style. Visiting his shop is always a wonderful adventure of discovery and surprise. We never know what we will find when we walk thru his front door.

FAB bronze brackets on the front stoop!!!

Bronze Brackets, Andrew Spindler Antiques

Devine regency Style painted chairs. Mmmm!

Regency Style Painted Chairs, Andrew Spindler Antiques

How about these rare Folly Cove Designer prints? When the designs ceased to be produced, their sample books, prints and remnants were donated to the Cape Ann Museum.

Folly Cove Designers, Andrew Spindler Antiques

Or this early two piece table? Might fit perfectly into the Belgian Style kitchen we’re designing.

antique two piece table, Andrew Spindler Antiques

If mid-century modern is your style, he’s got you covered…

pair of mid-century modern chairs, Allen Spindler Antiques

My absolute favorite was the huge French horse racing poster, in perfect condition.

French horse racing poster, Allen Spindler Antiques

And these little painted rocks…

I really wanted to bring them home with me…

Hand painted rocks, Andrew Spindler Antiques

We drove back to the office refreshed and recharged.
I wonder where our next drive will take us?

Cheers,

john

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I periodically post design sketches of the projects we’re working on on our WKD Facebook page. I thought I’d consolidate a series of sketches and mockups we have done on the interior renovation of the living room in an Antique Colonial/Federal Period Reproduction home to show the progression we go thru with a client when we’re working thru the design of the interior architecture of a room with them.

First it’s the ideas and inspiration.

Sometimes it comes from our own work, as in the paneling and mantel surround we designed for a home in Lincoln, MA several years ago.

Colonial paneling and mantel surround designed by Wilson Kelsey Design

Or it can come from from the traveling Sally and I do, as we continue to educate ourselves, learning about our profession and architectural heritage. These are pictures I took in the basement of the Swan House in Atlanta, Georgia last spring. They are of the paneling that was in Philip Trammel Schutze’s apartment, the architect of the Swan House.

Philip Trammel Schutze apartment, Swan House; Wilson Kelsey Design

Philip Trammel Schutze apartment, Swan House; Wilson Kelsey Design

We often turn to our library as a resource. For this project, I pulled Brent Hull’s, Traditional American Rooms off the shelf. It is a fabulous documentary of many of the Federal Period Rooms at Winterthur. I referred to this book recently as I worked on the mantel and cabinetry design for a project we are doing in Wellesley and Charlestown.

The Marlboro Room

Marlboro Room Winterthur

The Hampton Room

Winterthur, The Hampton Room

I reviewed these and other images with our client, went thru their own extensive library with them and began sketching, quickly coming up with 4 ideas.

I call these little sketches/doodles “cartoons”. They don’t communicate much detail, rather they express Gestalt – feel, emotion, a sense of place.

first Federal Period paneling/mantel sketches; Wilson Kelsey Design

Our client pounced on the bottom left because of the mantel. They asked that we keep the door frame assembly simple, as shown on the right of the sketch.

We then moved into more detail and larger scale, reconfirming the selected mantel design in the process.

Yes, the walls will be green – not this intense…

living room mantel elevation, WIlson Kelsey Design

Too leggy…

Federal style paneling and mantel; Wilson Kelsey Design

Next we drilled down to the panel trim.

This shows the panel trim within the confines of the stiles and rails of the paneling. Note how the door trim/assembly has been pulled forward, proud of the paneling, emphasizing it’s verticality, giving the room “lift”. (Lesson learned when visiting Paris last January.)

Federal Period Style Panel; Wilson Kelsey Design

Here the trim sits proud of the stile/rail assembly by about 1/8″. We liked the shadow line created by the difference in height.

Federal Style Paneling Study; Wilson Kelsey Design

We moved on to mock ups and what I call the “eyeball design” phase, confident of the outcome…

Six different mockups were done. I”ll keep it simple.

Here are the two finalists.

Trim proud of stile/rail; Wilson  Kelsey Design

Trim within the stile/rail; Wilson Kelsey Design

We got fooled. What we thought would be best was not. The trim that sat proud of the stile rail called too much attention to itself. You saw a series of picture frames as opposed to an integrated whole, which is what we saw with the trim that sat fully within the stile/rail assembly. it was softer, more delicate – in balance with the room.

Repeat after me.

Pencils are cheap. 2×4’s are expensive.

Mock ups, mock ups, mock ups!!!

Fractions of an inch actually matter – tremendously!!!

And so, the unfinished room awaits it’s final assembly.

federal style paneling and mantel in construction; Wilson Kelsey Design

Take a close look at the flu assembly – how it corbels to the right to pass steel beam supporting the second floor.

I wonder what happens on the second floor…

Cheers,

john

To visit our website, click here.

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If you would like our assistance on your design project, contact us here.