Decorative Painting

The Paris Design District hosts an event called Paris Deco Off, that runs concurrently with Maison et Objet. We were a 10 minute walk to where the bulk of the particiapting show rooms and antique shops were located, near the magnificent St. Sulpice Church. A carnival atmosphere prevailed, with giant lampshades hanging high in the air above the streets. Each lampshade had the name of a participating show room.

Deco Off 2015; photo by Wilson Kelsey Design

While our main focus was visiting fabric showrooms in the neighborhood, we couldn’t resist dropping in on the tiny antique shops we would pass by.

antique shop; Wilson Kelsey Design

Deco Off antique shop; photo by Wilson  Kelsey Design

Please, someone give this terra cotta horse a home!

terra cotta horse; WIlson Kelsey Design

Once again, there was so much, I’ll share a sampling of the hi-lites. The Zuber showroom was amazing. Known primarily for their incredible wall paper and murals (declared a French National Treasure) they also make beautiful fabrics.

Zuber; WIlson Kelsey Design

I find myself fantasizing about an upholstered wall every time I look at this image.

Zuber fabric, Paris showroom; WIlson Kelsey Design

Fortuny was another stop on Sally’s agenda. Absolutely luscious! Photographs don’t do the richness and luster of the fabrics justice. But first, we had to stop to admire their showroom window. The little foxes in their kimonos were cute beyond belief!

Fortuny window; Wilson Kelsey Design

Fortuny 2015 fabrics; photo by WILson Kelsey Design

Fortuny fabrics; Wilson Kelsey Design

Then it was on to the de Gournay showroom. De Gournay’s array of wallpaper, fabrics, furniture mirrors and porcelain is breath taking. A random sampling of images…

de Gournay showroom, paris_france

de Gournay  wall paper and mirror; WIlson Kelsey Design

de Gournay porcelain; WIlson Kelsey Design

Do you think they would sell me this antique sofa? Fabulous!

De Gournay antique; Wilson Kelsey Design

At the other end of the furniture spectrum, we find Grange, with it’s updates spin on classic antique furniture pieces. LOVE!!! I can see one of these in a classic French style foyer.

Grange buffet; Wilson Kelsey Design

Grange furniture; photo  by Wilson Kelsey Design

Next post, the Paris Nobilis show room. It was the hi-lite of our Deco Off visit.

Cheers,

John Kelsey, Wilson Kelsey Design

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With over 3,500 images to sort thru this turned out to be a much more difficult task than I had originally imagined. There are well over 300 “favorite ” images including building exteriors, landscapes, stairs, lighting, paneling, floors, etc. (And this doesn’t include the food/restaurant pics…) Some of these images serve a practical purpose as I see a detail I feel I can learn something from. Others record a “Holy Cow! that is incredible!!!” moment.

I’ll start with this one – a happy accident. Taken in the Louvre, I took a picture of the crown molding detail of a museum display case. It wasn’t until later, going thru the images when Sally and I returned to Salem that I saw what was in the background. I guess I was hyper focused… (We designers can be like that…)

From the Louvre as well. Note – the marble on left is faux. Sally and I saw this frequently and were in awe of it’s beauty.

 

I’m quite sure I took this at Versailles. Several important things here. The use of crystal to reflect and reflect light, increasing/enhancing the candle light from the chandelier. How the adjacent room is connected visually thru the use of light. And as I as to began to see and understand as our visit went on, as ornate as the crown and wall/panel trim were, they were based on the same classical orders and forms as later less orange periods/styles. There was great continuity as one style evolved and morphed into the next over several centuries.

And this was simply overwhelming… The lantern in foyers and foyer-like spaces was an element we saw repeatedly.

 

Fontainebleau yielded a few gems. The scale of this chandelier was massive!

It was interesting to see how Napoleon adapted rooms to his taste and style. This is the ceiling in his bedchamber, formerly the king’s reception chamber.

Vaux Le Vicomte was my favorite chateau and the predecessor to Louis XIV‘s Versailles.  Let’s start with a ceiling detail in the foyer. Spectacularly classical and ahead of it’s time.

These next two images display unbelievable faux painting/finish work. The sheer number of talented artisans employed to complete/finish buildings such as this boggles my imagination.

When Louis XIV had his finance minister, Nicholas Fouquet arrested, he stripped Vaux Le Vicomte of many of it’s valuable features, including tapestries. I believe the fabric panels and frieze indicate where tapestries originally hung. Note again, the extent of faux painting.

A ceiling detail of Fouquet’s bed chamber.  The image speaks for itself…

The bed chamber… No wonder a young Louis XIV was jealous, had him arrested and put in prison for life!

 

And I conclude with an image from the Carnavalet Museum, whose purpose is to preserve the history of the city of Paris. While the museum was described to us as a collection of historical artifacts, it was so very much more – especially the rooms that they have salvaged and preserved as the grand “Hotels” of Paris were demolished years ago.

And an image I need to figure out where it was taken… My guess is Versailles or the Louvre.

 

Hope you’ve had a mini-vacation as we slide into the month of December and the Holiday Season.

Cheers,

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We’re making good progress on our Celebrity Series of Boston piano. As I mentioned in our last  post, we needed to rethink portions of our design. Late last week, we met with Lena and Doug of Zoe Design and finalized the runner that will cover the main body of the piano.

At the bottom right of the above photo, you can see the the various test strips Doug prepared for us to evaluate and the combination we finally selected just in front of the chair.

Here’s a detail shot… Look very closely at the bottom right corner of the larger “feather” sample where we did a test of the clad lacquer finish coat. It really pops and brightens things up!

Over the weekend, Dave of Fantastic Finishes (978-578-4160) very carefully partially dismantled the piano. After masking off the piano’s inner workings, he primed and painted. The masked areas are where the runner will go (less the keyboard, etc.).

Some of the bits and pieces primed to receive the paper runner.

Tomorrow, Doug will being applying the paper. Can’t wait to see it!!! Then the final step will be several clear coats of lacquer to make it all Pop!!!

While Sally was at the Design Center last week, she dropped in on the Studio to see how the other pianos were coming along. Everyone was having fun painting/creating their pianos and great progress was being made!

The excitement and energy is building! We’re so looking forward to seeing all the finished pianos in one room early next week, before they are disbursed throughout the city!

Next post will be on my friends from Woodmeister Master Builders’ making and contributing 45 piano benches to the cause! BRAVO and THANK YOU!!!

Have a wonderful week!

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If you would like our assistance on your design project, contact us here.