Antiques

Sally’s and my presentation on “Creating French Style in your Home” on Sunday at the French Cultural Center was a HUGE success! We came away feeling there is still a place for elegant, classy and sophisticated traditional interiors in the world. During the post presentation social, while champagne and madeleines were being served by the staff from the fabulous Newbury Street French restaurant La Voile, a lady approached Sally and told her, “I’ve been waiting 20 years for someone to do a presentation like this!” Another came up to me and said, “Now I understand why and how the parts and pieces fit together!” Happy Dance!!! It made us feel like our hard work had paid off!

During the presentation, these slides in particular created quite a discussion. I was going thru my Mirrors and Mantels section of the presentation (We had 10 topics/touch points.), explaining and illustrating how and why mirrors were placed and used in 18th century French homes to reflect light and/or to visually expand a room. Using this picture I took of a room in the Musee Carnavalet, I asked whether we were seeing into another room or were we looking into a mirror?

carnavalet, photo  by John Kelsey, Wilson Kelsey Design

The answer is we are looking into a mirror. But you need to look twice to notice the picture hanging in front of the mirror. with the window and lantern appearing as they do, it is easy to think you are looking into another room with a window beyond. I asked the attendees to remember this picture.

A short time later I showed this picture of a Parisian apartment done by French designers Champeau and Wilde.

Champeau & Wilde

Then this one and posed the same question. Are we looking into a second room or are we looking at a mirror?

Champeau & Wilde

This is a tough one, no? Most thought we were looking into a mirror. But we are not. We’re looking thru a large hole in the wall between the two pair of doors into the room beyond! Fabulous! Look carefully at the crown molding. The closer room is simple with ornamentation in the corners only. The far room has brackets running the length of the molding. Look at the picture some more and you begin to pick up other details and clues. What else do you see?

Cheers and have a great week!

John Kelsey, Wilson Kelsey Design

To visit our website, click here.

To follow us on Facebook, click here.

To follow us on Pinterest, click here.

If you would like our assistance on your design project, contact us here.

These past few years, the design term Eclectic Style has become a well worn catch all phrase describing any number of combinations of furniture, fabric and lighting, etc. in a room – most of which I struggle to understand and come to grips with. To me, an Eclectic Style project has to be as carefully and thoughtfully curated as any other style that comes to mind. I further propose selection and placement become more critical as various pieces of differing styles and periods are asked to play off each other in a room.

I’d like to share a delightful story I came across in the Jan/Feb 2105 issue of Elle Decor that meets my criteria. It is an apartment in Milan overlooking the 16th Century Chiesa di San Barnaba e Paolo. (I’d take the apartment for the view alone…)

Interior Design, J J Martin 6, Photographer, Kasia Gatkowska

Purchased by fashion writer JJ Martin and her husband, she recounts a delightful tale of the renovation of the apartment. But what first caught my eye were the pictures – a delightfully eclectic blend of furniture, lighting and accessories set against a background of wonderful colors and textures. Enjoy the tour.

Living Area: 1930’s chairs paired with 1970’s Massimo sofa. Original mantel and wood floor.

Interior Design, J JMartin 1; Photographer, Kasia Gatkowska

Dining Area: 1940’s Italian dining table, 1970’s Italian chandelier, 18th century bas relief.

Interior Design, J J Martin 1a; Photographer, Kasia Gatkowska

Sitting area: 19th century drawings and Maurizio Galimbreti photo above custom sofa.

Interior Design, J J Martin 2; Photographer, Kasia Gatkawska

Bedroom: Poliform bed, 1950’s bedside table and lamp and table lamp made from an 17th century candelabra.

Interior Design, J J Martin; 3 Photographer, Kasia Gatkowska

Desk: 1970’s walnut desk, 1940’s French chair, 1950’s sconce and 18th century antique mirror.

Interior Design, J J Martin 5, Photographer, Kasai Gatkowska

Have a great week!

John Kelsey, Wilson Kelsey Design

To visit our website, click here.

To follow us on Facebook, click here.

To follow us on Pinterest, click here.

If you would like our assistance on your design project, contact us here.

I am going to preface this post by first saying a huge THANK YOU to David Webster and his “gang” at Webster & Co. for making this all possible!  Sally and I can only begin to imagine the time and energy it took…  Sally is going to co-write this piece with me, so you will also hear her voice.

We’ve saved the best for last, not counting the restaurants, food and wine, which would involve several more posts… (We’re happy to oblige.)  We were so impressed with the Nobilis Paris showroom layout and fabrics, we visited it twice. First, to simply take in the lovely new fabric lines. Second to meet with Eric Valero, their Creative Director, where we had an opportunity to discuss their new lines in more detail.

Eric Valero, Nobilis Creative Director and Sally Wilson; photo by Wilson Kelsey Design

Sally particularly liked the great discussion she had with Eric, which ranged from why Nobilis uses particular mills for particular products, to the availability of yards and threads throughout the recent economic recession.

While we were chatting with Eric, the President of Nobilis, Denis Halard, dropped by to say “Hello.” We played dress up with their new fabric offerings…

John Kelsey; Eric Valero, Nobilis Creative Director; Denis Halard, Nobilis President; photo by Wilson Kelsey Design

Their vignettes presented the fabrics beautifully! Sally notes the deep richness of color they are showing. Very saturated.

Nobilis vignette, Photo by Wilson Kelsey Design

Paired below is a soft color, of a rich cut velvet, but with that saturated hue in the toss pillow.

Nobilis vignette, Photo by Wilson Kelsey Design

Can’t you just picture yourself here? Here we are in the upstairs Nobilis lounge. A riot of color, but so sophisticated and assured. No color fear here.

Nobilis vignette, Photo by Wilson Kelsey Design

Rich, deep colors. tones and textures…  Love that pop of yellow in the cording!

Nobilis vignette, Photo by Wilson Kelsey Design

Other color ways of the fabric shown in the above toss pillow.

Nobilis fabric, Photo by Wilson Kelsey Design

An example of their gauffrage velvet, which gives an upscale look to absolutely Anything!

Nobilis fabric, Photo by Wilson Kelsey Design

I love their new look to their scenes. This is a printed pattern, and look how detailed it is, and how rich the colors are. You almost want to pluck a leaf from that tree, it is so real. There is a freshness to the scenes – nothing directly out of the China of the past, and yet the scenes are of past Chinese life. You have to see it and feel it to realize the difference.

Nobilis fabric, Photo by Wilson Kelsey Design

Here I am admiring, and feeling, one of my favorites: a large geometric. This is so classic, you can never get tired of it, and yet it is fresh and new, with its bold scale, and its subtle color variations.

Nobilis fabric, Photo by Wilson Kelsey Design

A fabric type that Nobilis does so well – the textured stripe. A velvet stripe coexists with a soft tone on tone texture, and then that stripe of cut fibers creating an almost fringe! Fantastico! Formidable!

Nobilis fabric, Photo by Wilson Kelsey Design

We were also invited to an intimate wine tasting in an apartment around the corner from the showroom, which gave John an opportunity to view the interior architecture of a smaller scale Paris residence.

Lovely…

Nobilis wine tasting, Photo by Wilson Kelsey Design

The apartment door was very narrow. John was very excited to see the very same trim profiles we had seen in Versailles and the Louvre.

Nobilis wine tasting, Photo by Wilson Kelsey Design

Sally was ready to move in…  (Why not?)

Sally Wilson at Nobilis Wine Tasting, photo by Wilson Kelsey Design

Hope you enjoyed our show room tour!

Cheers,

sally and John

To visit our website, click here.

To follow us on Facebook, click here.

To follow us on Pinterest, click here.

If you would like our assistance on your design project, contact us here.